Athenian reaction to defeat similar to US reaction to 9/11 terrorist attacks

In this excerpt from The Histories, part of the Old Western Culture series, a Great Books video course, Wes Callihan shows how the reactions that the Athenians had to a defeat is very similar to other reactions of democracies throughout history, and specifically similar to the reaction of the United States to the terrorist attacks on the World Trade Center on September 11th, 2001. Thucydides wants us to make these parallels as he explains at the beginning of “The History of the Peloponnesian War.” YouTube version here.

Literature Done Right!

How is Old Western Culture  “Literature done right”? —It is a CHRISTIAN approach to Literature; it integrates the story of History, Theology, and Philosophy, into THE GREAT STORY. —It is a CLASSICAL approach to Literature, spanning the literary and ideological traditions that have shaped the fabric of our cultural heritage. —It is a HOMESCHOOL approach to Literature: cost effective, structured, flexible, and just as much for parents as for students! Learn the story of Western Civilization from a master storyteller! Old Western Culture: A Christian Approach to the Great Books! Find out MORE.

A Defense of French as a Classical Language | By Luke Dickson

The importance of Latin as part of a classical education has been well-established. Latin is the language that built the West. It was the language of the Church. It was the language of philosophy, rhetoric, and science. It was how cultures communicated with each other for hundreds of years. What many don’t know is that French filled many of those same roles. In the last 300 years, the role of the French language has largely paralleled the role of Latin of the last 2,000 years. Here are four reasons why the study of French should be considered as part of … Continue Reading “A Defense of French as a Classical Language | By Luke Dickson”

The Goal of Education: Peripheral Vision

Dr. Roy Atwood, in an article called Recovering Peripheral Vision, speaks first of the failure of the current academia of this age as they seek practical jobs and vocational training while mocking the “useless” liberal arts. He then talks about the real goal of education, which is to see both broadly (or peripherally) and how one thing connects to another. It turns out that these are the skills we end up actually using, even if usefulness was not the point! Dr. Roy Atwood is one of the founders of New Saint Andrews College and served as its President from 2004-2014. He currently serves as … Continue Reading “The Goal of Education: Peripheral Vision”

Socrates Searched for Jesus | by Steven Hunter

In Plato’s Meno, Socrates and Meno were conversing about the meaning of virtue and how one obtained it. Meno believed that virtue was relative to a person’s age, sex, and station in life (e.g. slave or free). He, then, posited that virtue was the ability to govern humanity, believing that justice was a virtue. As the conversation progressed, the meaning changed several times, but the turn came when the talk of obtaining virtue began to revolve around if one could learn virtue. Socrates asked But if the good are not by nature good, are they made good by instruction? Based … Continue Reading “Socrates Searched for Jesus | by Steven Hunter”

John Chrysostom on the temptations to both rich and poor

St. John Chrysostom talks about the temptations to both rich and poor. He points out that while the sins of the rich tend to be obvious, the sins of the poor are just as egregious, and are not as evident. Chrysostom was the archbishop of Constantinople in the late 300s AD, and is a very influential Church Father, often quoted by Reformers like John Calvin who appreciated his pastoral teaching. This is from a collection of his homilies called On Living Simply: The Golden Voice of John Chrysostom. Students of Old Western Culture will learn about Chrysostom in Romans: Nicene Christianity.

Cincinnatus and George Washington

Lucius Quinctius Cincinnatus was a Roman farmer in the 5th century B.C. Because Rome was in dire need of a leader to fight off invaders, the Roman Senate asked Cincinnatus to be “Dictator” for a term of six months. The Roman Senate was worried that the person they chose as dictator might not return the power to the Senate when the time was up. But the reason they chose Cincinnatus was that he was known to be a man of virtue, who had proven himself as a consul. After two weeks, he had taken care of the situation with their … Continue Reading “Cincinnatus and George Washington”

2015 Great Books Challenge for Parents (and how to earn FREE curriculum)

Are you giving your kids (or have given them) the classical education you never had? My invitation to you this new year is to dive in yourself! Old Western Culture is for parents too! While it may be daunting to pick up the Great Books and start reading, make 2015 the year you do it YOURSELF, and earn some FREE curriculum in the process! So here is my NEW YEARS CHALLENGE TO PARENTS: As a parent, use our newly released unit of Old Western Culture, The Aeneid, YOURSELF (with your kids if they’re the right age) before May 15th, 2015 UPDATE: EXTENDING DATE … Continue Reading “2015 Great Books Challenge for Parents (and how to earn FREE curriculum)”