Supposing He’s Super

By Kaycie Kelly Second Place Winner of the 2016 Scribenda Summer Essay Contest Jesus is my Superhero.” Those were the words I saw posted big and bold on the back of a t-shirt. Call me irreverent, but it made me laugh. It sounded so cheesy, as if we were trying to advertise Jesus. “Lookie here kids, Jesus is just as cool as Superman.” Out of all the awe-inspiring, glorious names of Jesus (Almighty God, King of kings and Lord of lords, to name a few), superhero is all we could come up with? But though at first laughed, I now … Continue Reading “Supposing He’s Super”

The Last Enemy

The Last Enemy By Sophia Klomparens Winner of the 2016 Scribenda Summer Essay Contest Superhero stories have existed as long as humanity can remember, beginning with epics such as Homer’s Iliad and Odyssey. The larger-than-life characters of Achilles and Odysseus share much in common with the powerful figures of Batman and Superman, the wind-swept shores of Troy echo the dark streets of Gotham, and the sweet island of Ithaca reminds us of the planet Krypton. Clearly, superheroes have been a part of human history for much longer than the term itself has existed. But every superhero story, whether ancient or … Continue Reading “The Last Enemy”

Athenian reaction to defeat similar to US reaction to 9/11 terrorist attacks

In this excerpt from The Histories, part of the Old Western Culture series, a Great Books video course, Wes Callihan shows how the reactions that the Athenians had to a defeat is very similar to other reactions of democracies throughout history, and specifically similar to the reaction of the United States to the terrorist attacks on the World Trade Center on September 11th, 2001. Thucydides wants us to make these parallels as he explains at the beginning of “The History of the Peloponnesian War.” YouTube version here.

Feeding the Dragon

The realm of fairy-story is wide and deep and high and filled with many things: all manner of beasts and birds are found there; shoreless seas and stars uncounted; beauty that is an enchantment, and an ever-present peril; both joy and sorrow as sharp as swords.  —J. R. R. Tolkien, On Fairy Stories There is a certain something about fairy tales that keeps us coming back for more. It’s quite puzzling, really, when you think about it: we know these stories so well, and yet we never tire of hearing them. By all accounts, we ought by now to be … Continue Reading “Feeding the Dragon”

74 Books I Read Aloud to my Children

I recently had the pleasure of listening to Andrew Pudewa, the director of the Institute for Excellence in Writing and a father of seven, speak at an education conference on the importance of reading aloud to your children. As he spoke, I recalled with delight the many hours I spent reading to my four children before they went to sleep. My eldest is about seven years older than the youngest. I would first read the Bible, making sure I at least turned the page every night. We read it all the way through, Genesis to Revelation, over and over again (once we finished … Continue Reading “74 Books I Read Aloud to my Children”

Elie Wiesel, RIP

Elie Wiesel died today. He is one of the 30 famous orators featured in Fitting Words: Classical Rhetoric for the Christian Student. Elie Wiesel (1928–July 2nd, 2016). Wiesel was a professor, author, political activist, and Holocaust survivor. He has received numerous awards, including the Nobel Peace Prize. Wiesel has delivered speeches before several U.S. presidents. “I learned the perils of language and those of silence.” —Speech to Ronald Reagan objecting to his visit to a German cemetery, 1985 Find out more about Elie Wiesel in this CNN video, and this one.

Could your child enter Harvard in 1869?

Harvard University adopted the following words, based on their mission statement, as part of their “Rules and Precepts” in 1646: Let every Student be plainly instructed, and earnestly pressed to consider well, the maine end of his life and studies is, to know God and Jesus Christ which is eternal life (John 17:3) and therefore to lay Christ in the bottome, as the only foundation of all sound knowledge and Learning. And seeing the Lord only giveth wisedome, Let every one seriously set himself by prayer in secret to seeke it of him (Prov. 2:3). Thoroughly dedicated to Scriptures as … Continue Reading “Could your child enter Harvard in 1869?”

“My Wife is the Most Beautiful Woman in the World”

A Series Exploring C.S. Lewis’ The Four Loves In this second installment on The Four Loves by C. S. Lewis, David Foucachon explores how Lewis’s commentary on Eros can help us understand the objective nature of beauty. I am a Christian platonist. But neither Plato, nor the Neoplatonists, nor even St. Augustine convinced me of platonism. No, it was my wife’s beauty that made me a platonist. More specifically, the task of reconciling subjective aesthetic experiences with a worldview that affirms the objective nature of beauty. If we affirm that beauty is objective (and we should), then how can two men each … Continue Reading ““My Wife is the Most Beautiful Woman in the World””

A Survey of the History of Rock and Roll

Join Dr. Chris Schlect and the students of Logos High School as they explore the origins and progression of rock and roll through the first few decades of its existence, and the part it played in our culture, ending with a live performance of “Stairway to Heaven” by the Logos Dad’s Band. More On Classic Rock: Wes Callihan on Rory Gallagher, Pinkerton Detective Agency, and Clint Eastwood… Logos Benefit Concert: Where Classic Rock Meets Classical Education Logos Dad’s Band Concert 2013 Image by Jay Niemeyer.

Roman Speed Dating

Welcome to #ClassicalClickbait, incredible stories from antiquity that still astound us today! Follow the Classical Clickbait Twitter or Facebook for more #ClassicalClickbait! The first settlers of Rome—all men—were at a loss to find wives, and eventually turned to some rather desperate measures to make sure they each got a wife! Learn in this clip how they tricked the neighboring Sabine tribe into coming over for a feast, and then carried off the women to make them their wives! Eventually, the fathers and brothers of the wives attacked the Roman men to get the women back, but were in for a surprise from the women they … Continue Reading “Roman Speed Dating”