Five Important Women of the Reformation You Should Know About

Most Christians have heard the names of John Calvin, Martin Luther, John Knox, and other giants of the Protestant Reformation in Europe. But there are many, many other men and women who worked to advance the cause of the Reformation! It is my pleasure to introduce you to five extraordinary women of the Reformation! Each of these women played an important role, either in disseminating the ideas of the Reformation, or using their political power to protect the preachers and teachers of these ideas. Marguerite de Navarre (1492-1549) — The Diplomat Marguerite de Navarre was truly a Renaissance woman. Born … Continue Reading “Five Important Women of the Reformation You Should Know About”

A Defense of French as a Classical Language | By Luke Dickson

The importance of Latin as part of a classical education has been well-established. Latin is the language that built the West. It was the language of the Church. It was the language of philosophy, rhetoric, and science. It was how cultures communicated with each other for hundreds of years. What many don’t know is that French filled many of those same roles. In the last 300 years, the role of the French language has largely paralleled the role of Latin of the last 2,000 years. Here are four reasons why the study of French should be considered as part of … Continue Reading “A Defense of French as a Classical Language | By Luke Dickson”

Ted Cruz and Marcus Cicero

O tempora, O mores! (Oh the times! Oh the customs!) Ted Cruz, a republican senator from Texas, made a daring move Thursday—and put a good classical education to work! In a speech against what Cruz perceives as Obama’s overreaching policies and unconstitutional moves, Ted Cruz adapted a famous speech delivered by Marcus Tullius Cicero in 63 B.C. Cicero, a Roman statesman (whose work you get to read in Old Western Culture: The Romans), discovered a plot by Catiline to overthrow the government and ignite a general insurrection in Italy. Cicero delivered a series of speeches, now called the Catiline Orations, exposing Catiline’s plot … Continue Reading “Ted Cruz and Marcus Cicero”

Why Christians Should Celebrate Halloween

The origins of Halloween are often confusing, but there is evidence of some clear influences. Traditionally, Halloween is thought to have arisen from three sources: The pagan celtic holiday Samhain The Roman festivals of Pomona and Feralia Christian celebration of All Saints’ Day. Let’s look at each of these festivals. Celtic Samhain Samhain was something of a combination of a harvest festival and a day of the dead for the Celts of Britain and northern France. As counterpart to the May festival, Bealtaine, which ushered in the summer months, Samhain announced the coming of winter, and thus a kind of death … Continue Reading “Why Christians Should Celebrate Halloween”

7 Ways Henry V was a Christian King

The Mirror of all Christian King Was Henry V a “Christian King?” William Shakespeare, in his play Henry V, seems to say “yes!”. There is a famous line in the play which calls Henry “the mirror of all Christian kings.” What does Shakespeare tell us about his ideals of kingship through Henry V? Let’s look at some examples: He is valiant. We began to see this in Henry IV Part One, when Henry is wounded, he keeps fighting. In Henry V, he courageously leads his men, both at Harfleur and Agincourt. He sends away the French herald who has come to … Continue Reading “7 Ways Henry V was a Christian King”

Fashion in Ancient Rome

In many aspects, ancient Rome was a modern state. They had city planning, sewage, hot baths, heated floors, elaborate customs, traditions, and a rich culture. After the fall of Rome, there was a brief “dark ages” in which much of the technology and culture of Rome disappeared. That period is not as long as some would have you think (a subject discussed in the Old Western Culture curriculum), but there was a decline. But when we think back to Rome’s height, we normally think of its technology, conquests, or even its debauchery as it declined. But what about ancient Rome’s … Continue Reading “Fashion in Ancient Rome”

The Chrysler Motor Company and Classical Art

The Benefits of a Classical Education for…Car Design? We can see the influences of ancient classical art all around us, from the symmetrical lines of early 19th century architecture and the imposing columns on government buildings, to the classically inspired clothing of Jane Austen’s day. But have you ever heard of a classically-inspired car? I certainly hadn’t! However, while doing work for a project, I came across this 1929 Chrysler car advertisement:                               Yes, in the 1920s, Chrysler decided to look forward by looking back to … Continue Reading “The Chrysler Motor Company and Classical Art”

Guédelon: A Modern Building of an Ancient Castle

Have you ever found yourself reading a very old book and wondering “How did they do it all?” The castles, the battles, the art, the clothing? I still can’t read a history book, or even a historical novel, without trying to imagine the historical context around each story. So when I found out about Guédelon, I got really excited! In a century when houses are built in less than a year, and even skyscrapers take only a few years, it’s hard for us to fathom what the architectural feats of yesteryear actually involved. Guédelon bridges the gap between our imaginations … Continue Reading “Guédelon: A Modern Building of an Ancient Castle”

Roman Feasting | Friday Foray

Friday Foray is a series of posts about fun and interesting facts about the classical world, education, or trivia. Enjoy and share! Roman Feasting Gastronomy is nothing new under the sun. In fact, the Romans beat many of even our most avant-garde efforts. Sumptuous feasts were a way to impress your friends and potential allies, so no expense was spared by rich citizens. One Roman, Lucullus, even had different rooms where he would receive different guests of varying worth–and of varying cost to himself. The highest guests were said to cost around 25,000 sesterces (circa $2,500) per person. The wilder the … Continue Reading “Roman Feasting | Friday Foray”