A total weirdo was hanging around Penelope’s palace…When I saw who he was? MIND. BLOWN.

Penelope was a tragic war-widow…or was she? Will this mysterious stranger’s secret change everything she thought she knew? Odysseus has returned home at long last to Ithaca, his own island, after twenty years of war and wandering. But chaos reigns at home! While he’s been gone, a multitude of suitors, hoping to claim his throne, are pursuing the hand of Odysseus’ wife, Penelope. Penelope has held out these twenty years, but is running out of ideas to keep the suitors at bay as she wonders if her husband will ever return, or if he is long-dead. As she gives her … Continue Reading “A total weirdo was hanging around Penelope’s palace…When I saw who he was? MIND. BLOWN.”

Seconds before dying, Croesus did THIS…

Welcome to #ClassicalClickbait, incredible stories from antiquity that still astound us today! Follow the Classical Clickbait on Facebook for more #ClassicalClickbait! Herodotus tells us of the story of Croesus, who is bound on a pyre about to be burned alive. Right as the fire is lit, Croesus remembers the words of Solon, and calls out loud, “oh, Solon, Solon – you were right!”. Watch the video to find out what happens next! YouTube version HERE. Want to purchase this video course? Click HERE.

Scribenda: A Summer Essay Contest

Ready, set, Scribenda! Put your thinking cap on, and write an essay in answer to the question below! The winning essay answering the question will be featured in the first issue of our magazine, Aristeia, and receive hardback, bilingual, Loeb Editions of The Iliad, The Odyssey, and The Aeneid, as well as a $50 Amazon gift card! Question: “DO WE EVER OUTGROW FAIRYTALES?” How to enter: Share this post on your own Facebook or Twitter account. Get out your quills, typewriters, or iPads, and write away! Submit your essay by email to info@romanroadsmedia.com with subject line “Essay Entry” no later than August 31 at 11:59 pm (PST). EXTENSION: September 7th deadline! Parameters: Open to all high … Continue Reading “Scribenda: A Summer Essay Contest”

Literature Done Right!

How is Old Western Culture  “Literature done right”? —It is a CHRISTIAN approach to Literature; it integrates the story of History, Theology, and Philosophy, into THE GREAT STORY. —It is a CLASSICAL approach to Literature, spanning the literary and ideological traditions that have shaped the fabric of our cultural heritage. —It is a HOMESCHOOL approach to Literature: cost effective, structured, flexible, and just as much for parents as for students! Learn the story of Western Civilization from a master storyteller! Old Western Culture: A Christian Approach to the Great Books! Find out MORE.

Educating Royalty | by Dr. Roy Atwood

We must teach our children to be Kingdom heirs—not just laborers in the marketplace “Who are you?” a university student once asked me. Odd question, I thought. I’d handled countless student questions, but this one caught me unprepared. “Uh . . . I’m a professor,” I answered weakly. “No!” he shot back. “I don’t mean what do you do, but who are you?” His question unsettled me. Like most North Americans, I’d been carefully, though not intentionally, catechized since a lad at my parents’ side that the first and most important question we ask adults at first meeting (after getting … Continue Reading “Educating Royalty | by Dr. Roy Atwood”

Socrates Searched for Jesus | by Steven Hunter

In Plato’s Meno, Socrates and Meno were conversing about the meaning of virtue and how one obtained it. Meno believed that virtue was relative to a person’s age, sex, and station in life (e.g. slave or free). He, then, posited that virtue was the ability to govern humanity, believing that justice was a virtue. As the conversation progressed, the meaning changed several times, but the turn came when the talk of obtaining virtue began to revolve around if one could learn virtue. Socrates asked But if the good are not by nature good, are they made good by instruction? Based … Continue Reading “Socrates Searched for Jesus | by Steven Hunter”

The Greatest Roman | By Wes Callihan

Vergil’s Aeneid, the epic poem which tells the story of the wanderings of Aeneas on his way to becoming the founder of Rome, is propaganda. But such a statement would not have bothered Vergil a bit. “Propaganda” in Latin simply means “things which ought to be propagated,” and Vergil certainly believed that the values espoused in his story needed to be spread about a bit. Aeneas was the ultimate Roman, primarily because he revered the gods. “Pious Aeneas” is the epithet used of him throughout the poem, and if anyone missed the point, they were asleep during the reading. Aeneas modeled for … Continue Reading “The Greatest Roman | By Wes Callihan”

John Chrysostom on the temptations to both rich and poor

St. John Chrysostom talks about the temptations to both rich and poor. He points out that while the sins of the rich tend to be obvious, the sins of the poor are just as egregious, and are not as evident. Chrysostom was the archbishop of Constantinople in the late 300s AD, and is a very influential Church Father, often quoted by Reformers like John Calvin who appreciated his pastoral teaching. This is from a collection of his homilies called On Living Simply: The Golden Voice of John Chrysostom. Students of Old Western Culture will learn about Chrysostom in Romans: Nicene Christianity.

Cincinnatus and George Washington

Lucius Quinctius Cincinnatus was a Roman farmer in the 5th century B.C. Because Rome was in dire need of a leader to fight off invaders, the Roman Senate asked Cincinnatus to be “Dictator” for a term of six months. The Roman Senate was worried that the person they chose as dictator might not return the power to the Senate when the time was up. But the reason they chose Cincinnatus was that he was known to be a man of virtue, who had proven himself as a consul. After two weeks, he had taken care of the situation with their … Continue Reading “Cincinnatus and George Washington”

Plundering the Egyptians | by Wesley Callihan

I will give this people favor in the sight of the Egyptians, and it shall be, when you go, that you shall not go empty-handed. But every woman shall ask of her neighbor, namely, of her who dwells near her house, articles of silver, articles of gold, and clothing; and you shall put them on your sons and on your daughters. So you shall plunder the Egyptians. – Exodus 3:21-22; 12:35-36 Does secular literature have any value for a Christian? There are so many good books by Christians – why should we waste our time with anything else? For many … Continue Reading “Plundering the Egyptians | by Wesley Callihan”