The Old Western Culture Great Books List

Old Western Culture is a great books curriculum. But it has some differences with many other great books curriculums, as well as with your average great books list or printed series. The Old Western Culture great books list is a distinctly Christian list. It has all the famous favorites you’ll recognized from something like the Britannica Great Books of the Western World, but it also includes books that are often left out of modern editions for various reasons, most often because they are from the “Age of Faith.” We include more works from the early Church Fathers, Medieval period, and the Reformation. These … Continue Reading “The Old Western Culture Great Books List”

Athenian reaction to defeat similar to US reaction to 9/11 terrorist attacks

In this excerpt from The Histories, part of the Old Western Culture series, a Great Books video course, Wes Callihan shows how the reactions that the Athenians had to a defeat is very similar to other reactions of democracies throughout history, and specifically similar to the reaction of the United States to the terrorist attacks on the World Trade Center on September 11th, 2001. Thucydides wants us to make these parallels as he explains at the beginning of “The History of the Peloponnesian War.” YouTube version here.

A Conversation with John Hodges about The Center for Western Studies

Daniel Foucachon sits down with John Hodges from The Center for Western Studies, to discuss what they are all about, and why they offer a Gap Year Program. ABOUT CWS: “The Center for Western Studies is an experiment in education. Our goal is to offer our students two things: a Christian view of the world, and a study of the ideas that shaped Western civilization. Western culture is by no means perfect, but it is ours, and so it is essential as Christians that we engage with it, reflect on it, sort out the good from the bad, and in … Continue Reading “A Conversation with John Hodges about The Center for Western Studies”

A glimpse at what we lost when we abandoned classical education

Mark Twain is attributed with the saying “Those who don’t read have no advantage over those who can’t.” We are now a couple generations away from our forefathers who abandoned classical education. We are now the generation that does not even know what it has lost. Wes Callihan gives a  glimpse at the kind of richness we have lost in this excerpt from the Old Western Culture curriculum on the great books of Western civilization. If you don’t study the classics, you have no advantage over those who can’t. Roman Roads Media provides tools to help you accomplish this task! Get started today! … Continue Reading “A glimpse at what we lost when we abandoned classical education”

Great Books Challenge for Parents 2016

Welcome to the 2016 Great Books Challenge for Parents! This Challenge is for any parent, but especially for parents who plan to classically homeschool their children, or who are currently homeschooling their children. Classical homeschoolers love Old Western Culture because they see their children coming to the dinner table full of stories, and thirsty for knowledge and wisdom. Make 2016 the year classical learning comes alive in your home, and earn free curriculum in the process! Last year’s Great Books Challenge, centered around Virgil’s Aeneid, was a tremendous success! This year we are going to continue and build upon that challenge, adding the following unit, Romans: … Continue Reading “Great Books Challenge for Parents 2016”

A total weirdo was hanging around Penelope’s palace…When I saw who he was? MIND. BLOWN.

Penelope was a tragic war-widow…or was she? Will this mysterious stranger’s secret change everything she thought she knew? Odysseus has returned home at long last to Ithaca, his own island, after twenty years of war and wandering. But chaos reigns at home! While he’s been gone, a multitude of suitors, hoping to claim his throne, are pursuing the hand of Odysseus’ wife, Penelope. Penelope has held out these twenty years, but is running out of ideas to keep the suitors at bay as she wonders if her husband will ever return, or if he is long-dead. As she gives her … Continue Reading “A total weirdo was hanging around Penelope’s palace…When I saw who he was? MIND. BLOWN.”

3 Ways Dante Influenced C.S. Lewis | Part I

C.S. Lewis’s love for Dante Alighieri and The Divine Comedy was no great secret. Lewis first read Dante’s Inferno in the original Italian when he was in his teens and later read Purgatorio while he was in the hospital recovering from wounds received in World War I. He finally read Paradiso for the first time in 1930, before he became a Christian, but after he had reluctantly decided that there was a God. At this point, he was still very much conflicted as to the nature of God and whether or not there was an afterlife. After finishing Paradiso, he told … Continue Reading “3 Ways Dante Influenced C.S. Lewis | Part I”

Literature Done Right!

How is Old Western Culture  “Literature done right”? —It is a CHRISTIAN approach to Literature; it integrates the story of History, Theology, and Philosophy, into THE GREAT STORY. —It is a CLASSICAL approach to Literature, spanning the literary and ideological traditions that have shaped the fabric of our cultural heritage. —It is a HOMESCHOOL approach to Literature: cost effective, structured, flexible, and just as much for parents as for students! Learn the story of Western Civilization from a master storyteller! Old Western Culture: A Christian Approach to the Great Books! Find out MORE.

The Greatest Roman | By Wes Callihan

Vergil’s Aeneid, the epic poem which tells the story of the wanderings of Aeneas on his way to becoming the founder of Rome, is propaganda. But such a statement would not have bothered Vergil a bit. “Propaganda” in Latin simply means “things which ought to be propagated,” and Vergil certainly believed that the values espoused in his story needed to be spread about a bit. Aeneas was the ultimate Roman, primarily because he revered the gods. “Pious Aeneas” is the epithet used of him throughout the poem, and if anyone missed the point, they were asleep during the reading. Aeneas modeled for … Continue Reading “The Greatest Roman | By Wes Callihan”

John Chrysostom on the temptations to both rich and poor

St. John Chrysostom talks about the temptations to both rich and poor. He points out that while the sins of the rich tend to be obvious, the sins of the poor are just as egregious, and are not as evident. Chrysostom was the archbishop of Constantinople in the late 300s AD, and is a very influential Church Father, often quoted by Reformers like John Calvin who appreciated his pastoral teaching. This is from a collection of his homilies called On Living Simply: The Golden Voice of John Chrysostom. Students of Old Western Culture will learn about Chrysostom in Romans: Nicene Christianity.