A glimpse at what we lost when we abandoned classical education

Mark Twain is attributed with the saying "Those who don't read have no advantage over those who can't." We are now a couple generations away from our forefathers who abandoned classical education. We are now the generation that does not even know what it has lost. Wes Callihan gives a  glimpse at the kind of richness we have lost in this excerpt from the Old Western Culture curriculum on the great books of Western civilization. If you don't study the classics, you have no advantage … [Read more...]

Cicero on Rhetoric: Ethos, Pathos, and Logos

Wesley Callihan tells the story of Cicero and Varres, and how Cicero used Rhetoric to convince his audience that Varres was wrong. We can see the three branches of good rhetoric: Ethos (appeal to authority), Pathos (appeal to emotion), Logos (appeal to reason). This excerpt is taken from The Historians, a unit from the Old Western Culture curriculum on the great books of Western Civilization. For a complete Rhetoric curriculum, where these ideas are taught in depth, see Fitting Words: … [Read more...]

Great Books Challenge for Parents 2016

elcome to the 2016 Great Books Challenge for Parents! This Challenge is for any parent, but especially for parents who plan to classically homeschool their children, or who are currently homeschooling their children. Classical homeschoolers love Old Western Culture because they see their children coming to the dinner table full of stories, and thirsty for knowledge and wisdom. Make 2016 the year classical learning comes alive in your home, and earn free curriculum in the process! Last … [Read more...]

The Greatest Roman | By Wes Callihan

Vergil's Aeneid, the epic poem which tells the story of the wanderings of Aeneas on his way to becoming the founder of Rome, is propaganda. But such a statement would not have bothered Vergil a bit. "Propaganda" in Latin simply means "things which ought to be propagated," and Vergil certainly believed that the values espoused in his story needed to be spread about a bit. Aeneas was the ultimate Roman, primarily because he revered the gods. "Pious Aeneas" is the epithet used of him throughout the … [Read more...]

John Chrysostom on the temptations to both rich and poor

St. John Chrysostom talks about the temptations to both rich and poor. He points out that while the sins of the rich tend to be obvious, the sins of the poor are just as egregious, and are not as evident. Chrysostom was the archbishop of Constantinople in the late 300s AD, and is a very influential Church Father, often quoted by Reformers like John Calvin who appreciated his pastoral teaching. This is from a collection of his homilies called On Living Simply: The Golden Voice of John … [Read more...]

Cincinnatus and George Washington

Lucius Quinctius Cincinnatus was a Roman farmer in the 5th century B.C. Because Rome was in dire need of a leader to fight off invaders, the Roman Senate asked Cincinnatus to be "Dictator" for a term of six months. The Roman Senate was worried that the person they chose as dictator might not return the power to the Senate when the time was up. But the reason they chose Cincinnatus was that he was known to be a man of virtue, who had proven himself as a consul. After two weeks, he had taken care … [Read more...]

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