A Debt Owed to Love | Communication & Gift-Giving

Communicating accurately and well is an act of love. We have to love both the object that is being communicated as well as the recipient of that object. Communicating means giving and not taking. We need to care about the person to whom we are writing or speaking—in every instance. We all have read certain writers who appear to write in order to see themselves on the page. They write as if they are constantly looking in a mirror. They are the obsessive selfie-takers. They are the ones who walk down the sidewalk with their headphones in so that they … Continue Reading “A Debt Owed to Love | Communication & Gift-Giving”

Fitting Words Rhetoric: Sample Lesson (Lesson 12)

Here is one full lesson from the Fitting Words Rhetoric curriculum so you can get a feel for how the course works. Each lesson of Fitting Words Rhetoric has two videos: Lesson and Application. In addition, there is an exam prep video for each of the nine exams throughout the course. We recommend students follow these steps while going through Fitting Words: Read the lesson in the textbook Watch the Lesson portion of the video course Work on the exercises in the Student Workbook. Watch the Application portion of the video course (workbook open). Where appropriate, put the application/workbook to … Continue Reading “Fitting Words Rhetoric: Sample Lesson (Lesson 12)”

Rhetorical Figures covered in Fitting words

The video course that accompanies Fitting Words Rhetoric begins each lesson with a review of a rhetorical figure. These are covered again in detail in lesson 27, but students will already be familiar with them and using them. Here is the list of what figures are emphasized (with examples) in each lesson. The Glossary/Index at the back of the textbook has definitions for each of these. Fitting Words – Rhetorical figure per Lesson 1. Parallelism / isocolon 2. Antithesis 3. Ellipsis / zeugma 4. Asyndeton 5. Polysyndeton 6. Parenthesis 7. Alliteration / assonance 8. Antimetabole / chiasmus 9. Anaphora 10. Epistrophe … Continue Reading “Rhetorical Figures covered in Fitting words”

Why do we Learn to Read Latin?

Latin is the ancient language originally used in the central region of Italy onced called Latium, where Rome is located. As Rome’s empire grew to include most of Europe and vast portions of Asia and Africa, the Romans’ native tongue, Latin, gradually became the official language of the peoples they had subjugated; and within a few centuries after Christ it had become the equal of Greek as a language of literature, philosophy, and theology. When the Roman empire finally disintegrated as a political entity, Latin lived on: the history, literature, and science of the ancient Romans had unprecedented influence on … Continue Reading “Why do we Learn to Read Latin?”

THE NEWBURGH CONSPIRACY OF 1783

“I have ever considered that the United States are indebted for their republican form of government solely to the firm and determined republicanism of George Washington at this time.” – David Cobb, member of Washington’s staff On a chilly Wednesday morning in December, Colonel Thomas Pride and the Regiment of Foot took up position on the steps leading to the House of Commons, while Nathaniel Rich’s Regiment of Horse stood by if reinforcements were needed. As the members of Parliament arrived to perform their usual duties, they were astonished to find these military troops stationed on the steps. Colonel Pride … Continue Reading “THE NEWBURGH CONSPIRACY OF 1783”

DESTROYING the TEMPLE: C.S. Lewis on Distorted Love

But love, in the Christian sense, does not mean an emotion. It is a state not of the emotions but of the will; that state of the will which we have naturally about ourselves, and must learn to have about other people. – C.S. Lewis [1] In just two short sentences, C.S. Lewis strikes a hard blow against the understanding of love that runs wild in our current popular culture. Words like “will” and “learn” are words that rarely, if ever, crop up in any discussions about love. They sound so contrary to the spontaneous eruption of emotion and infatuation that … Continue Reading “DESTROYING the TEMPLE: C.S. Lewis on Distorted Love”

Why the King stood for the Hallelujah chorus

When the music for this biblical passage began, King George, I believe, made a statement about royal authority and honor: The Christian King of England is not the Supreme Authority, but he is one under authority and must show honor and respect to his Supreme Lord, the King of Kings. Just as people rise to show honor and respect in the presence of their English Royals, King George could do no less, as one under Authority. Here’s my argument for why the King George stood that day and why we should still do so today. King George II stood up … Continue Reading “Why the King stood for the Hallelujah chorus”

Five Ways God Loved Mary

“My soul magnifies the Lord, and my spirit rejoices in God my Savior, for he has looked on the humble estate of his servant. For behold, from now on all generations will call me blessed.”   –Luke 1 Two thousand years after Christ was born of the virgin Mary, millions of Christians around the globe call Mary blessed, especially during the Christmas season. God loved Mary, and Mary loved God. Five Ways God Loved Mary One | God gave Mary the privilege of giving birth to the long-awaited Messiah After the fall, God told Satan that the Seed of the woman … Continue Reading “Five Ways God Loved Mary”

What do we mean by “Liberal Arts”?

As Christians recover classical Christian education, they are unearthing old treasures, once the possession of every educated man. Some of these treasures are words and descriptions–terms like “Trivium” and “Quadrivium,” “paideia,” and “liberal arts.” Of all these terms, “liberal arts” lays at the heart of what classical education is all about. So what did our forefathers mean by “liberal arts”? “Liberal” The word liberal has nothing to do with our modern use of the word in politics and culture. Liberal means “free,” and historically described the kind of education expected of a freeman–especially one in a position of leadership, like … Continue Reading “What do we mean by “Liberal Arts”?”

Review of Fitting Words by Brian Daigle

If Proverbs says that “A word fitly spoken is like apples of gold in settings of silver,” then a page of Fitting Words is an apple tree, and a book of those pages is a fitting orchard. Fitting Words is a fitting orchard for which our Christian communities are in desperate need. This book may be written for high school students and teachers, but we ought not think the material covered here is beneath any of us, for a proper study of rhetoric ought to be required for doctoral candidates and plumbers alike. So, taste. And see that rhetoric, when … Continue Reading “Review of Fitting Words by Brian Daigle”